Invitation to a Doctoral Meeting of L’EEPB Bibracte (27 and 28 April 2016)

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The doctoral meeting organized by the European School of Protohistory in Bibracte (EEPB) seeks to bring together European PhD and postdoctoral students working on the Iron Age. This project continues the work of the 1st Doctoral Meeting, organized in April 2015 in Bibracte (Burgundy, France). The principal aim of this meeting is to foster discussions on interdisciplinary topics, in various geographical and cultural contexts.

All PhD and postdoctoral students (who have graduated within the last three years) are invited to present both posters AND oral presentations (which may even have been already presented at another seminar).

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Presentation Invitation

uam artehis

ÚAM Brno and ArTéHiS Dijon

would like to invite you to the presentation of

Josef Wilczek

in collaboration with Fabrice Monna, Nicolas Navarro, Ahmed Jebrane, Catherine Labruère Chazal, Sebastien Couette, Jérome Bolte, Phillipe Barral and Carmela Chateau

named:

« And what if it can be done by it’s own? »

dealing with acquisition, automatic drawing and classification of archaeological artefacts,

which will take place on  29/01/2016 at 11:00  in the room C 42.

CeramDessins

Morphometrics of Bronze Age flanged axes

Paper on the morphometrics of Middle Age Bronze axes was published in the Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports.

Abstract:

The classification of Western European flang734281.gifed axes dating to the Middle Bronze Age (1650–1350 BC) is very complex. Many types of axe have been identified, some of which have numerous variant forms. In the current French terminology, all axes are divided into two generic groups: namely “Atlantic” (Atlantique) and “Eastern” (Orientale). Each of these generic groups, however, is highly polymorphic, so that it is often very difficult for the operator to classify individual axes with absolute confidence and certainty. In order to overcome such problems, a new shape classification is proposed, using morphometric analysis (Elliptic Fourier Analysis) followed by unsupervised model-based clustering and discriminant analysis, both based on Gaussian mixture modelling. Together, these methods produce a clearer pattern, which is independently validated by the spatial distribution of the findings, and multinomial scan statistics. This approach is fast, reproducible, and operator-independent, allowing artefacts of unknown membership to be classified rapidly. The method is designed to be amendable by the introduction of new artefacts, in the light of future discoveries. This method can be adapted to suit many other archaeological artefacts, providing information about the material, social and cultural relations of ancient populations.

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